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Mathematics

Course Resources

Math Course Sequence

The Math Course Flow Chart lists the sequence of courses a student should take based on individual majors.

The descriptions of current math courses can be viewed on the College Catalog

 

Math Course Description

MATHEMATICS 10 Math As a Second Language (MSL)

1 UNIT, Lecture 1 hour

Students study the basic mathematics sequence. The course introduces mathematical language and notation, along with fundamental concepts necessary for successful completion of the mathematics sequence. Topics include writing and speaking mathematical language, understanding how to determine what a problem is asking, and a multi-step program for solving problems. Also included are techniques that will enable students to have a positive outlook toward future mathematics classes.

MATHEMATICS 100 Mathematics Workshop

1 UNIT, Lecture 5 hours

Students can supplement and enhance learning in mathematics through tutorial and self-help assistance, calculators, computers, programmed texts, and other learning aids.

MATHEMATICS 115 Elementary Algebra

5 UNITS, Lecture 5 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 112 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent.

This course covers operations on real numbers and algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities in one variable, graphing linear equations and inequalities in two variables, solving systems of linear equations in two variables, exponents, operations on polynomials, factoring polynomials, operations on rational expressions, solving rational equations, simplifying radical expressions, solving radical equations, solving quadratic equations, and graphing quadratic equations.

MATHEMATICS 125 Intermediate Algebra

5 UNITS Lecture 5 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 115 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent or by Appropriate Placement.

Students learn techniques for solving compound linear inequalities as well as absolute value equations and inequalities, solving systems of linear equations in two and three variables, simplifying non-linear expressions, and solving non-linear equations such as polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic. Students learn techniques for rewriting the equation in the standard form for parabola and circle, and graph. Students learn how to compute terms and sums of arithmetic and geometric series. Students will apply the binomial theorem to expand the binomial with given power. Applications are included in a wide variety of word problems.

MATHEMATICS 134 Accelerated Elementary and Intermediate Algebra

6 UNITS Lecture 6 hours
Prerequisite: By Appropriate Placement.
An accelerated course covering topics from Elementary and Intermediate Algebra. Topics include linear equations and inequalities, exponents, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions, rational equations and inequalities, radical expressions and equations, quadratics equations and inequalities, graphing linear and nonlinear equations and inequalities, system of linear and nonlinear equations and inequalities, functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and conics.

MATHEMATICS 167 Pre-Statistics

5 UNITS Lecture 5 hours
Prerequisite: By Appropriate Placement.Students learn key concepts of descriptive statistics such as observational and experimental design, graphical and tabular displays of data, measures of center and spread, probability, the normal distribution, and regression. This course is designed as a prerequisite solely for MATH 227 (Statistics). Students will not get math competency credit for taking this course towards an AA/AS degree. If students wish to proceed to another course other than MATH 227, they would need to take MATH 125 or MATH 134.

MATHEMATICS 202 Mathematics Workshop II

1 UNIT (CSU) Laboratory 3 hours

Students supplement and enhance their learning in mathematics by providing tutorial and self-help assistance, calculators, computers, programmed text, and other learning aids for baccalaureate level mathematics courses.

MATHEMATICS 215 Principles of Mathematics I

3 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 3 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 125 or 134 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent or by Appropriate Placement.

This course is the first of two in a sequence designed for prospective elementary school teachers. The student will learn topics including sets and relations, numbering systems, and elementary number theory. The main emphasis, however, will be understanding the structure of systems of whole numbers, integers, and rational numbers.

MATHEMATICS 216 Principles of Mathematics II

3 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 3 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 215 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent.

This course is the second of two in a sequence for prospective elementary school teachers. Topics include decimal and real numbers, rational numbers, abstract mathematical systems, geometry and the metric system.

MATHEMATICS 227 Statistics

4 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 4 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 125, 134, or 167 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent or by Appropriate Placement.

The use of probability techniques, hypothesis testing, and predictive techniques to facilitate decision‑making. Topics include descriptive statistics; probability and sampling distributions; statistical inference; correlation and linear regression; analysis of variance, chi‑square and t‑tests; and application of technology for statistical analysis including the interpretation of the relevance of the statistical findings. Applications using data from disciplines including business, social sciences, psychology, life science, health science, and education.

MATHEMATICS 227S Statistics with Support

4 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 3 hours/Lab 2 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 125, 134, or 167 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent or by Appropriate Placement.

The use of probability techniques, hypothesis testing, and predictive techniques to facilitate decision‑making. Topics include descriptive statistics; probability and sampling distributions; statistical inference; correlation and linear regression; analysis of variance, chi‑square and t‑tests; and application of technology for statistical analysis including the interpretation of the relevance of the statistical findings. Applications using data from disciplines including business, social sciences, psychology, life science, health science, and education.

MATHEMATICS 229 Statistics for Data Science

4 UNITS (CSU) Lecture 4 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 125, 134, or 167 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent or by Appropriate Placement.

This course examines fundamental concepts that are the building blocks for data science work, include gathering and summarizing data (descriptive statistics) and relationships between variables, probability techniques, and distributions such as conditional probability and Bayes’ Theorem, and hypothesis testing to facilitate decision-making (inferential statistics). This course will analyze the pros and cons in decision theory through the exploration of sampling and control limits. Students will study correlation and regression analyses such as linear models for data science and multivariate regression and the application of technology for statistical analysis including the interpretation of the relevance of the statistical findings to data science. The course will examine applications using data from disciplines including engineering, business, natural and social sciences, and psychology. There will be a hands-on approach to statistical analysis using the tools (statistical software) of choice, such as Python and R.

MATHEMATICS 230 Mathematics for Liberal Arts Students

3 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 3 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 125 or 134 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent or by Appropriate Placement.

Students receive instruction in topics which include linear equations and functions, applications of linear functions, systems of linear equations, matrices, system of linear inequalities, linear programming using the graphical method, mathematics of finance, logic, set theory, probability, basic counting, and statistics.

MATHEMATICS 236 Calculus for Business and Social Sciences

5 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 5 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 125 or 134 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent or by Appropriate Placement.

This course consists of elementary differential and integral calculus of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as derivatives and the method of Lagrange multipliers. Applications to business and the social sciences are emphasized.

MATHEMATICS 245 College Algebra

3 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 3 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 125 or 134 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent or by Appropriate Placement.

Students receive instruction to solve linear, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic equations; graph linear, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions; solve linear and nonlinear systems of equations and inequalities; sequences and series.

MATHEMATICS 258 Geometry and Trigonometry

5 UNITS (CSU) Lecture 5 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 125 or 134 with satisfactory grades or equivalent.

Students learn the definitions, axioms, and theorems of geometry relating to angles, lines, circles, and polygons. Practice in critical thinking and developing logical proofs are emphasized. This course also includes the study of the sine, cosine, and tangent functions, including a study of their graphs, inverses of the functions, basic properties of the cotangent, secant, and cosecant functions, measurement of angles in degrees and in radians, evaluating triangles, solving trigonometric equations, models for periodic phenomena, trigonometric identities, vectors, complex number, and polar coordinates.

MATHEMATICS 260 Pre-calculus

5 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 5 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 258 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent or by Appropriate Placement.

Students prepare for calculus, which covers the properties of polynomial, rational, algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic identities and equations, trigonometric form of complex numbers and DeMoivre’s Theorem, conic sections with translation and rotation of axes, nonlinear systems of equations and inequalities, vector algebra with dot and cross products, polar coordinates and graphs of polar functions, partial fractions and mathematical induction.

MATHEMATICS 260S Pre-calculus with Support

5 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 4 hours/Lab 2 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 258 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent or by Appropriate Placement.

Students prepare for calculus, which covers the properties of polynomial, rational, algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic identities and equations, trigonometric form of complex numbers and DeMoivre’s Theorem, conic sections with translation and rotation of axes, nonlinear systems of equations and inequalities, vector algebra with dot and cross products, polar coordinates and graphs of polar functions, partial fractions and mathematical induction.

MATHEMATICS 261 Calculus I

5 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 5 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 260 or 260S with a satisfactory grade or equivalent.

This is the first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Topics include limits and continuity, rates of change, derivatives, applications of differentiation, integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and applications of integration.

MATHEMATICS 262 Calculus II

5 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 5 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 261 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent.

This is the second in a three-course sequence in calculus. Topics include differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential, circular and hyperbolic functions and their inverses, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, standard techniques of integration, applications of integration to problems from economics, biology and probability, parametric equations and polar coordinates, infinite sequences and series, and representation of functions as power series.

MATHEMATICS 263 Calculus III

5 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 5 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 262 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent.

Students solve problems from vectors calculus, parametric equations, surfaces, partial differentiation, gradient, maxima and minima for functions of several variables, multiple integrals, surface integrals, and line integrals. Students consider physical and mechanical applications of Green’s Theorem, Divergence Theorem, and Stokes’ Theorem.

MATHEMATICS 270 Linear Algebra

3 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 3 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 261 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent.

This course develops the techniques and theory needed to solve and classify systems of linear equations. Solution techniques include row operations, Gaussian elimination, and matrix algebra. Investigates the properties of vectors in two and three dimensions, leading to the notion of an abstract vector space. Vector space and matrix theory are presented including topics such as inner products, norms, orthogonality, eigenvalues, eigenspaces, and linear transformations. Selected applications of linear algebra are included.

MATHEMATICS 272 Methods of Discrete Mathematics

5 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 5 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 262 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent.

Students study logic, algorithms, number systems, mathematical induction, sets, counting principles, probability, Boolean algebra, logic network, Pigeonhole principle, cardinality and computability, recurrence relations and recursion, graph theory, switching circuits, trees.

MATHEMATICS 275 Ordinary Differential Equations

3 UNITS (UC: CSU) Lecture 3 hours
Prerequisite: Mathematics 262 with a satisfactory grade or equivalent.

Students learn to categorize different types of differential equations. Students learn to use techniques such as separation of variables, exact differentials, homogeneity, and change-of-variable (substitution) to solve first-order equations as well as first-order Initial Value Problems (IVPs). Students apply this knowledge to solve real-world problems such as population growth and mixture problems. Students learn to solve higher-order linear differential equations using constant coefficient technique, the method of undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters. Students apply this knowledge to physics applications such as simple harmonic motion. Students solve equations of higher-order with variable coefficients applying specific techniques based on the type of the given equations. Topics Include: Cauchy-Euler Equations, Power Series solutions, Bessel’s Equations, and Legendre’s Equation. Students learn the Laplace transform and its properties and apply this knowledge to solving various differential equations as well as IVPs. Students use techniques for solving Systems of Linear Differential Equations.