Cinema Course Descriptions

Included on this page:

Cinema 1 Introduction To Motion Picture Production
Cinema 2 Beginning Motion Picture Workshop
Cinema 3 - The History Of Motion Pictures
Cinema 4 - History Of The Documentary Film
Cinema 5 - Introduction To Screenwriting
Cinema 6 - Motion Picture Photography
Cinema 7 - Advanced Cinematography And Creative Techniques
Cinema 9 - Motion Picture And TV Sound
Cinema 10 - Introduction To Film Directing
Cinema 20 - Business Of Motion Picture Production
Cinema 32 - Editing Fundamentals
Cinema 33 - Digital Video Production Workshop I
Cinema 34 - Motion Picture Soundstage Production Practicum
Cinema 38 - The Motion Picture Grip
Cooperative Education and Work Experience
Law 33 - Law and the Media

CINEMA 1-INTRODUCTION TO MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTION (3 UNITS)

(4 hours per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

A comprehensive introduction to basic film and video production techniques and equipment. Proper procedures are explained for the use of digital and film cameras, lenses, filters,  film stocks, lights, microphones, audio recorders,  editing systems, and  other motion picture equipment.   Attention is also given to production planning and post-production as well. Cinema 2 should be taken concurrently. Required of all Cinema majors; open to all others.

Cinema 1,2,3, and 4 are prerequisites for most of the LACC cinema classes. We recommend that you take them the first semester

This class leads to several certificates

This class is offered both day and evening each semester. More information on Cinema 1

Filmmaker's Handbook 2012 image

Required textbook: 

The Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide in the Digital Age

by Ascher and Pincus, 2013

ISBN 978-0-452-29728-9

Other materials required: Paper for notetaking and scantron forms.

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CINEMA 2 - BEGINNING MOTION PICTURE WORKSHOP (3 UNITS)

(5 hours per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

Introductory workshop in practical filmmaking. A lecture and laboratory workshop including script, storyboard, direction, cinematography, sound and editing techniques. Each student will be responsible for the making of short films. Required of all cinema majors. Open to all others. We suggest taking Cinema 1 concurrently where  much of the technical information will be taught.

Cinema 1,2,3, and 4 are prerequisites for most of the other LACC Cinema classes. We recommend that you take them all the first semester so you may continue seamlessly through the program.

This class leads to several certificates

 

During the semester, you will write, direct and produce three films on digital video. While the school has equipment for student use, the inventory is not large.  While we have a limited number of cameras (Canon ZR's and Canon Vixias) and tripods (Bogens) that you can check-out,  we suggest you purchase your own equipment for convenience. We have 25 editing stations (iMac's with iMovie HD) so if you don't have your own editing system, we have  stations for you to to complete your projects. There is  no need to buy expensive equipment for this class; any digital camcorder and and recent computer (PC or Mac) will generally be just fine although there may be some technical limitations.  Consult with your instructor or technical staff.  This equipment can be used in subsequent classes as well. To get more information on pricing and features of digital camcorders and digital editing systems, go to "MiniDV Camcorders" and "Digital Video" on our Hotlinks page. We suggest that you withhold purchasing any equipment for this class until you attend the first class meeting to get more information. (Please note: While we can give full technical support for our equipment, there will be limitations with support for your system). Cinema 2 is offered both day and night each semester. 

For your convenience, there are four sections of this class each Fall and Spring.


Suggested textbook if you are editing in our lab: iMOVIE 6 & iDVD by David Pogue ISBN: 0596527268. This book is  available on Amazon.com

Required materials: Paper for notetaking, 1 miniDV cassette  (approx $5.00 each) minimum if you use our cameras or another miniDV digital video camera and a memory card for the Vixia camera. You may incur other expenses when producing your projects but costs vary depending upon a number of cirucumstances. If you purchase your own digital video camera, camera tripod, and computer with software. costs will be considerably higher depending upon the equipment you choose. See our Hotlinks page for more information about digital filmmaking.

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CINEMA 3 - THE HISTORY OF MOTION PICTURES (3 UNITS)

(4 hours per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

History of the development of motion pictures, with examples, from their beginnings to the present day. Emphasis is placed on the American feature film. Required of all first semester cinema majors; open to all students.

Cinema 1,2,3, and 4 are prerequisites for many of the other LACC Cinema classes. We recommend that you take them the first semester

This class leads to several certificates

In addition to lectures on film history, fiction films from the silent era to the modern day will be screened weekly and discussed in our theater. Students will write papers and/or take tests. This class is offered both day and evening each semester.

Required textbook: A Short History of Film by Dixon and Foster ISBN: 978-0-8135-4270-6

Other materials required: Paper for note taking. Some instructors will require Scantron forms.

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CINEMA 4 - HISTORY OF THE DOCUMENTARY FILM (3 UNITS)

(4 hours per week per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

The development of films dealing with the truth. Film types seen and discussed include: historical, animated, propaganda, educational, commercial, cinema verite and direct cinema. Students will develop critical standards for judging documentary films. Required of all first semester cinema majors. Open to all others.

Cinema 1,2,3, and 4 are prerequisites for many of the other LACC Cinema classes. We recommend that you take them the first semester.

This class leads to several certificates

Held in our theater, you will view a variety of documentary films. You will write papers and/or take tests. This class is offered both day and night each semester.

Required textbook: A New History of the Documentary Film - Second Edition by Betsy McLane. ISBN 1441124578  (List Price $34.95)

Other materials required: Paper for notetaking. Some instructors will require scantron forms.

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CINEMA 5 - INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING (3 UNITS)

(4 hours per week per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

Course work consists of writing screenplays. Cinema majors will write scripts for the films they will make in Cinema 33 or Television 55.

Note: Enrolled students will be dropped and non-enrolled students may not add if not present at the first class session.

Prerequisite: Cinema 1, 2, 3, 4 with satisfactory grades or better.

This class leads to several certificates

You will write scripts for short films that you may produce in Cinema 33 or Television 55. You will pitch your proposals to the class, prepare treatments, and then write and revise complete scripts. Offered day and night each semester.

Textbooks required:
Writing Short Films: Structure and Content for Screenwriters by Linda J. Cowgill, Lone Eagle, Second edition, 2005. ISBN-10: 1580650635.

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CINEMA 6 - MOTION PICTURE PHOTOGRAPHY (3 UNITS)  

(4 hours per week per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

Introduction to cinematography, including optics, photo emulsions, camera operation, lighting, laboratory procedures, terminology and aesthetics. Students will do individual and group projects using  digital and film camera equipment

Note: Enrolled students will be dropped and non-enrolled students may not add if not present at the first class session.

Prerequisite: Cinema 1, 2, 3, 4 with satisfactory grades or better.

This class leads to several certificates

The class will study the basics of composition with an emphasis on lighting. During the first half of the semester, each student will shoot still photos which will be viewed by the class and graded by the instructor. In the second half, each student will shoot cinematography exercises. Costs (other than textbook) vary between $50-300 depending upon scope of the projects. The student is expected to furnish his/her own camera for the still film and/or digital exercises. The school will provide lighting equipment. The class is held in Sound Stage C.

 

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CINEMA 7 - ADVANCED CINEMATOGRAPHY AND CREATIVE TECHNIQUES (3 UNITS)

(4 hours per week )

An advanced course in creative cinematography covering professional equipment and techniques used in the motion picture industry. Emphasis is placed on lighting and current industry standards.

Note: Enrolled students will be dropped and non-enrolled students may not add if not present at the first class session.

Prerequisite: Cinema 6 with satisfactory grade or better.

 

This class leads to a Cinematography Certificate

Cinematography: Theory and Practice by Blain BrownThe student will shoot a variety of slide projects but differing greatly from those in Cinema 6. The class will practice lighting in all types of conditions and locales (exterior and interior), from a variety of different light sources. Each student will additionally complete a  cinematography exercise either in film or digital.  Costs vary between $100 to $500 depending upon scope of projects. This class is very challenging. Offered during the evening only. The class is held in Sound Stage C.

Required Textbooks: Cinematography: Theory and Practice by Blain Brown, ($44.95) ISBN # 0-240-80500-3 - Focal Press

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CINEMA 9 - MOTION PICTURE AND TV SOUND (3 UNITS)

(4 hours per week per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

Students learn the basics of motion picture production and post-productionj sound.  Students use digital audio recorders, microphones and booms and learn how to properly record sound. Students learn to loop and mix sound using a digital audio program .

Note: Enrolled students will be dropped and non-enrolled students may not add if not present at the first class session.

Prerequisite: Cinema 1, 2, 3, 4 with satisfactory grades or better.

This class leads to several certificates

Audio in Media 8th Edition by Stanley AltenThe student will learn the basics of production and post-production motion picture sound. Each will master the operation of various digital recorders as well  as microphone placement and booming. Post-production techniques will be studied and each student will be introduced to Pro Tools audio software. Total cost of materials for class is approximately $100. Offered Saturdays.

Required textbooks: Audio in Media (8th Edition) by Stanley Alten (List $111.95) ISBN: 0495095680

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CINEMA 10 - INTRODUCTION TO FILM DIRECTING (3 UNITS)

(4 hours per week per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

The student is introduced to the crafts of acting and directing for the film medium.

Note: Enrolled students will be dropped and non-enrolled students may not add if not present at the first class session.

Prerequisite: Cinema 1,2,3, 4 with satisfactory grades or better.

This class leads to several certificates

The student will be required to direct one or two scenes with actors. Each week new scenes will be presented which the class and the instructor will evaluate. Offered during day and night Spring and Fall semesters.

Required textbook Total Directing by Tom Kingdon, Silman-James Press and Siles Press ISBN:1-879505-71-1

Total Directing by Tom Kingdon

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CINEMA 20 - BUSINESS OF MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTION (3 UNITS)

(3 hours per week per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

Survey of business practices including financing, production and distribution.

Note: Enrolled students will be dropped and non-enrolled students may not add if not present at the first class session.

Prerequisite: Cinema 1, 2, 3, 4, with satisfactory grades or better.

 

This class leads to a Cinema Production Certificate

 

Many business aspects of film production are covered in this very comprehensive and challenging class. The instructor will emphasize the budgeting and scheduling of a motion picture using professional production forms and methods. You will be required to purchase budgeting forms. Approximate material cost is $60 in addition to textbooks. Offered during the day in the spring semester, evening during the fall.

Required Textbooks: Film Scheduling, 2nd Edition by Ralph Singleton (List $22.95) IISBN: 0943728398; Rebel without a Crew by Robert Rodriquez (List $15) ISBN 0-452-27187-8. Optional Textbooks: Creating by Robert Fritz (List $19) ISBN 0-449-90801-1; How to Read a Book by Mortimer Jerome Adler (List $14) ISBN 0-671-21209-5.

How to Read a Book by Mortimer Jerome Adler Film Scheduling, 2nd Edition by Ralph Singleton Rebel Without a Crew by Robert RodiquezCreating by Robert Fritz

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CINEMA 32 - EDITING FUNDAMENTALS (3 UNITS)

(5 hours per week per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

Intermediate students develop editing skills using basic non-linear digital equipment.

Note: Enrolled students will be dropped and non-enrolled students may not add if not present at the first class session.

Prerequisite: Cinema 1, 2, 3, 4, with satisfactory grades or better.

This class leads to several certificates

The student will work with 16MM flatbeds and Apple Mac platforms using Final Cut Express to learn editing techniques. The class emphasis will be on improving aesthetic editing skills, not software or assistant editing procedures.  Projects will include cutting rushes from various films and TV shows and will be graded for correct editing fundamentals. All digital projects must be edited during class time in the department computer lab. Scenes from feature films will be analyzed and basic editing techniques discussed.

No Required Textbook.

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CINEMA 33-1 and CINEMA 33-2 - DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION WORKSHOP I (3 UNITS)

(5 hours per week per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

Intermediate film and television students will produce short video projects using digital video cameras and editing systems.

Note: Enrolled students will be dropped and non-enrolled students may not add if not present at the first class session.

Prerequisites: Cinema 1,2,3,4 with satisfactory grades or better.

This class leads to a Cinema Production Certificate

The student will shoot and edit two projects using a digital video camera (the school provides Canon HD units) and Final Cut  software on Mac computers under the supervision of the instructor. (You may use your own camera or editing equipment if so desired).

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CINEMA 34 - MOTION PICTURE SOUNDSTAGE PRODUCTION PRACTICUM (3 UNITS)

(5 hours per week per week  - Next Scheduled Semester to be Announced)

Designed for students to gain practical experience in a specific area of motion picture soundstage production in order to develop the necessary skills needed in that field of the industry. Included are screenwriting, directing, production management, lighting, cinematography, sound recording and editing.

Note: Enrolled students will be dropped and non-enrolled students may not add if not present at the first class session.

Prerequisite: Cinema 5 or 6 or 7 or 9 or 10 or 32 with a satisfactory grade or better.

 

Students work in crews on the soundstage and produce digital video projects every 2 weeks. Each student specializes in his or her area of expertise and interest. The class is held in Sound Stage C.

Required textbook: None

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CINEMA 38 - THE MOTION PICTURE GRIP (3 UNITS)

(4 hours per week per week during Fall and Spring Semesters)

 Uva's Basic Grip Book by Michael UvaIn this hands-on course, students learn basic grip skills and operate grip equipment and tools used in motion pciture stages, television studios and on location during film and television production.

No Prerequisites

Using the LACC soundstage and television studios, students will be trained and then work on student projects as grips using professional grip equipment.  You will become familiar with tools, expendables, knots, mounts, filters and gels, camera dollies and other specialized devices.

Required textbooks: Uva's Basic Grip Book by Michael Uva (List $28.95) ISBN 0-240-80485-6

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COOPERATIVE EDUCATION AND WORK EXPERIENCE (1 TO 3 UNITS)

Film and Television students receive credit for acceptable internships in the industry under the direction of supervising Cooperative Education director. Students meet occasionally with the director and keep a diary of their work. Internship opportunities are made available to the Cinema-Television Department but it is the responsibility of the student to secure one. This course is offered every semester, and is repeatable - no textbook. The student must be enrolled in seven or more units at LACC (which may include up to four Co-op Ed units).

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LAW 33 - LAW AND THE MEDIA ( 3 UNITS)

 

(3 hours per week during the Fall and Spring semesters)

An overview of the legal aspects of the entertainment industry. The student will be exposed to legal aspects of contractual agreements; copyright requirements; privacy; regulations of the Federal Communications Commission; libel and slander; freedom of speech and press; publishing rights; trademarks; unions; and related concerns.

Advisory: English 28 with a grade or better.

This lecture class is offered by the Law Department and is an option for the Cinema Production Certificate.

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