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Dental Trivia: Crowns

Minhoon, Dental Technology | Originally Published: 4/8/2019

A Crown is one of the most common dental prosthetic appliances that we make as Dental Technologists.

INTERESTING INFORMATION ABOUT DENTAL PROSTHETIC RESTORATIONS

Before we start here, what is a crown? According to Ness Dictionary, a crown is a cover. It’s a fixed restoration that covers a natural tooth.

Why do we need a crown? Simple. To protect a rotten tooth caused by a cavity, or after root canal restoration, a crown will be cemented in as a protection, and act as a replacement of an old amalgam filling because it generates mercury.

There are many different types of crown(s), which differentiate by their purpose and material.

gold crownThe most common crown we know is a Gold Crown, made with a gold alloy. It is commonly used in the posterior section (teeth that are far back) and their tarnish resistance and wear characteristics are very close to a natural tooth.

porcelain teeth 1A Porcelain Crown is widely used because it is a material that mimics the natural tooth more than anything else in the world.

The greatest advantage of a porcelain crown is that it looks just like a natural tooth, aesthetically and functional.

These are the two most common porcelain crown restorations:

A porcelain fused to metal (PFM) crownThe first is called a porcelain fused to metal, also known as PFM. A PFM is a crown that has porcelain on top of a metal substructure.


zirconia bridgeAnd the second is called Zirconia crown. A zirconia crown is a crown made out of zirconium oxide.

The choice of dental materials is based on:
  • The type of dental restoration,
  • Where it will be used in the mouth, and
  • Price

About The Author

Minhoon is originally from South Korea and is majoring in Dental Technology at LACC. He likes to listen to music, draw, and watch movies during his free time. His favorite part of Dental Technology is that he gets to make appliances that will change someone's weakness in oral cavity to an advantage.

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